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Tag Archives: Yes

peanut butter & pickle 042316

Recently, I noticed that when I hear unwelcome news I say one thing – “Oh no!” Whenever I say it, I feel the resistance to whatever I’m hearing, the clench against what is happening. Since then, I’ve been playing with saying Yes. It might be, “Yes and I’m so sorry.” Or it might be, “Yes and I see I have no control over that.” Or, “Yes, that’s not what I expected and this can work, too!” There is power in Yes. This week, five mini-postlettes about just that.

I know next to nothing about improv theater except that it makes my stomach quivery and that when it’s done well, it’s amazing. I’ve heard tell that when in an improv situation, and your partner says something

“Let’s take a bus to Mexico!”
“I think I’ll wear paisley to the wedding”
“Can you believe she did that in the middle of the Kroger frozen foods aisle?”

the appropriate response is, “Yes, and….”

“Yes, and let’s take your mother! She’s always wanted to learn Spanish.”
“Yes, and I’ll wear my yellow suit with green high tops since those are the groom’s school colors.”
“Yes, and the police were very nice, don’t you think?”

In improv, NO is a dead end. NO stops the conversation.
YES, and… offers curiosity. YES, and…offers possibility. YES, and…is an adventure.

Uri Alon’s TED Talk, Why Truly Innovative Science Demands a Leap into the Unknown, tells how the “Yes, and…” that he finds works so well in theater works just as well in science. Imagine! Mad improv skillz in a research lab! You can watch it here. 

It stands to reason if “Yes, and…” helps promote innovative science, “Yes, and…” can also promote innovative living. When someone says something unexpected or off-the-wall, experiment with saying “Yes, and…” and seeing where it takes you.

And if you want to hear about an incredible (and intense) improv adventure, listen to one of my favorite RadioLab podcasts, ever.

yes sweetcakes 042316

Recently, I noticed that when I hear unwelcome news I say one thing – “Oh no!” Whenever I say it, I feel the resistance to whatever I’m hearing, the clench against what is happening. Since then, I’ve been playing with saying Yes. It might be, “Yes and I’m so sorry.” Or it might be, “Yes and I see I have no control over that.” Or, “Yes, that’s not what I expected and this can work, too!” There is power in Yes. This week, five mini-postlettes about just that.

I have mixed feelings about the word “God.” I’ve so often heard it used judgmentally or manipulatively that I get a little twitchy when it’s bandied about. But this poem came through my Facebook feed not long ago and I loved it to pieces. If you prefer, use “The Universe” or “Spirit” or whatever you’d like to hear say YES to you.

God Says Yes To Me
by Kaylin Haught

I asked God if it was okay to be melodramatic
and she said yes
I asked her if it was okay to be short
and she said it sure is
I asked her if I could wear nail polish
or not wear nail polish
and she said honey
she calls me that sometimes
she said you can do just exactly
what you want to
Thanks God I said
And is it even okay if I don’t paragraph
my letters
Sweetcakes God said
who knows where she picked that up
what I’m telling you is
Yes Yes Yes

yes frog 042316

Recently, I noticed that when I hear unwelcome news I say one thing – “Oh no!” Whenever I say it, I feel the resistance to whatever I’m hearing, the clench against what is happening. Since then, I’ve been playing with saying Yes. It might be, “Yes and I’m so sorry.” Or it might be, “Yes and I see I have no control over that.” Or, “Yes, that’s not what I expected and this can work, too!” There is power in Yes. This week, five mini-postlettes about just that.

One of the many reasons my yoga teacher, Amy, is so awesome is that she is cheerfully honest about her practice. She doesn’t hide her own ups and downs on the mat and that helps me find the courage to practice patiently and without expectation. Her relaxed approach to her own monkey mind gets me to lighten up about mine.

After a Baptiste Power Yoga intensive a while back, she returned with her red mat autographed by her friends from the training. The people we share intense experiences with leave lasting marks on our hearts, so I understood the signatures.

But wondered about the frog.

IMG_20160422_091103778

At the top of her mat along with all the names was the picture of a little smiling frog.

Turns out that Baptiste invites yogis to say YES to whatever’s happening on (and off) the mat. Can’t balance in Tree to save your life? YES. Slipping and sliding on self-made sweat puddles? YES. Finally nailed Crow Pose? YES.

Amy said she was down with this approach until she got into Frog Pose. It’s a doosie, this one: belly down, knees wide, groins and inner thighs intensely stretching. Someone doing Frog looks like a poor amphibian who’s dealt with the business end of a car tire.

Amy said NO to Frog. She hated it and wanted to get out as soon as she got in (before then, even). To remind her that YES was an option, one of her yogi friends drew a little frog on her mat.

Amy likes to joke that she still says NO to Frog, but she doesn’t fool me. She is a yogi who knows the power of staying in even when things get uncomfortable. Especially then. She may not like it but she says YES to Frog…usually.

amy's frog

 

little yes 042316

Recently, I noticed that when I hear unwelcome news I say one thing – “Oh NO!” Whenever I say it, I feel the resistance to whatever I’m hearing, the clench against what is happening. Since then, I’ve been playing with saying Yes. It might be, “Yes and I’m so sorry.” Or it might be, “Yes and I see I have no control over that.” Or, “Yes, that’s not what I expected and this can work, too!” There is power in Yes. This week, five mini-postlettes about just that.

In 1966, John Lennon went to an avant-garde art gallery in London where a Japanese artist was exhibiting.

There were all kinds of things on display that John didn’t really get: an apple, a board with nails in it and a hammer attached, a card that said “Breathe.”

In the middle of the room was a tall ladder and at the top was a magnifying glass hanging from the ceiling. Feeling a little silly, he climbed the ladder, looked through the glass and saw one word in tiny print: YES.

ono - yes

The story goes that he got it and he loved it. When he came down the ladder, he met the artist, Yoko Ono.

You can read a more complete story here.

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